Eurobasket Swedes Abroad Assignment

Before the magic of Bali fades from our system we will try and relay what happened the last couple of days. The plan was to upload more posts during the journey but three days in to the conference it all became so hectic and the days became so long, there was simply no time. BUT here we are. for one final round. And what a fantastic couple of days we had.

The committee had done a fabulous job in keeping us busy, having planned to field trips per day for Thursday and Friday. On the first day we got to go snorkeling to see how the coral reef around Bali was coping with the climate change. As with most things climate related, it wasn’t all happy faces, however, we got to get insight into how the organisation Reef Check Indonesia is working towards a more sustainable way of enabling locals to take care of the reefs. And the waters around Bali were as wonderful as ever, giving some of us a glimpse of three playing dolphins.

Getting ready to snorkel at the Japanese Shipwreck.

After the reef check we moved on towards the next sight for sore eyes; Tirta Gangga; a spectacular water garden built in 1946 for the royal family.

Inga & DIna; Sweden, enjoying the gardens wearing fashionable sarongs.

At Tirta Gangga we were also given the pleasure of seing, and participating in(!), traditional Balinese dancing.

The dancers put on a spectacular show…

… and some of the people how chose Balinese dancing as their cultural activity a few days earlier were put to the test by the masters! 

On the second day of field trips we got up almost equally early and set out for the next spectacular day. This time we headed for the mountains to see an organic farm.

After an initial introduction to the farm, the corps and the farm’s way of using eco-friendly fertilization and pesticides we were put to work. Inga and Khalil; Sweden, doing a terrific job planting lettuce.

Before going to the farm, we were explicitly told to wear pants and not skirts. When asking the reason for this, as we were wondering if it was religious, we were given the information that it would be very cold and windy. Well… it was safe to say that for the Swedes this was not quite an issue as the temperature was still around 25 degrees and when, after an hour, the sun came out we all came home later that evening with quite a sunburn…

After having a phenomenal lunch at the farm, getting to taste their produce we got back on the buses and headed towards the next destination; Ulun Danu Beratan Temple. As we got there it was quite foggy and after an hour or so it started to rain, but all in all it was another wonderful (long) day.

Fernesto; Indonesia, displaying the temple depicted in the 50 000 Rupiah bill. 

SO. After three days of lectures, seminars and work shops and two days of field trips we finally had our free exploration day. Now, I won’t go into detail on what each of us did here, because I could go on forever showing you a million pictures of everyone’s fantastic adventures. If you want to know more about that; you’ll simply have to ask us!

However, we are moving towards the end and the last day was probably the biggest adventure of them all. We got up at dawn to participate in the grand finale organized by the committe; The Amazing Race. We all set out at 7.15 without breakfast, without a clue of where the race would take us. Unfortunately at 7.30 it started raining. Heavy. And it didn’t stop. By the time we reached the second challenge it had turned into a full blown storm we were all soaking wet and the committe decided to cancel the race.

 

It was very cold and very wet and we were not very happy. 

I cannot in words describe how wet we were, the only way to fathom it is by me telling you that as we got back to the hotel, we got in the pool fully dressed, and it didn’t make any sort of difference in terms of wetness.

After recovering for a while the day moved on to the poster presentation prepared by each group. Now this layout was a bit unfamiliar to many of us and the afternoon became a lot longer than we anticipated. Nonetheless we got to see many great posters proposing many good ideas for change.

At 5 pm we were all dressed and ready for the closing ceremony where we had been asked to wear traditional formal wear. Seeing how this is more common in Asian countries and not something you see everyday in the west, the surprise factor was quite high when Sofia showed up wearing an Ingelsta-dräkt belonging to her mother. In just a few minutes she, and everyone else who dressed in their absolutely beautiful traditional wear became tourist attractions with pictures taken left and right.

Sofia together with the Bangladesh delegation.

The closing ceremony was great with everyone receiving their diplomas and us getting to see several cultural performances and getting a final chance to say goodbye to each other, sharing laughs and tears from the past week.

So to sum up; this has been an absolutely incredible phenomenal adventure from start to finish and we would recommend anyone and everyone to part take in it if the opportunity is given next year. What you should know is this; the days are LONG, the cultural immersion is HIGH, and the experience is PRICELESS. Below is a list of things we would like to share with future delegations.

  • January is wet season in Indonesia so when they say bring raincoat/umbrella – do. Because it will rain. At times A LOT.
  • The cost of being in Bali is not very high. We had exchanged between 800 and 2000 SEK and depending on how much shopping you did, this was perfectly enough.
  • You will be tired. The days will be long, warm and require a lot of energy so EAT. Plenty and often.
  • If there is anything you don’t understand in the conference guide write and ask the committee; they will answer and clarify!
  • Don’t bring to much clothes; you will not wear it all. You will not change as much as you think.
  • The sun in Indonesia is fierce; use sunscreen. Indonesia is on/below the equator; respect that.
  • Take every opportunity to speak with the other delagations; get to know them; talk about their cultures, and ask as many stupid questions as you can think of. This is the knowledge and experience that you cannot put a price on.
  • Oh, and drink water! Keep track of yourself so that you don’t become dehydrated. Dehydration is no fun.

There. If you stuck with us this long; congratulations! We’ve had a wonderful journey and we hope you’ve enjoyed it with us. In hindsight we are still in awe both that we made it to Bali but also that we made it home..!

 Three exhausted girls on the train from Copenhagen after 24 hours of travelling (Khalil was on a different flight than us 🙂 ) 

Thank you for joining us this past week!

/Dina, Inga, Khalil & Sofia/

 

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"WNBA" redirects here. For other uses, see WNBA (disambiguation).

The Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) is a women'sprofessional basketball league in United States. It is currently composed of twelve teams. The league was founded on April 24, 1996 as the women's counterpart to the National Basketball Association (NBA), and league play started in 1997. The regular season is played from May to September with the All Star game being played midway through the season in July and the WNBA Finals at the end of September until the beginning of October.

Five WNBA teams have direct NBA counterparts and play in the same arena: the Indiana Fever, Los Angeles Sparks, Minnesota Lynx, Phoenix Mercury, and Washington Mystics. The Atlanta Dream, Chicago Sky, Connecticut Sun, Dallas Wings, Las Vegas Aces, New York Liberty, and Seattle Storm do not share an arena with a direct NBA counterpart, although four of the seven (the Dream, the Sky, the Wings, and the Liberty) share a market with an NBA counterpart, and the Storm shared an arena and market with an NBA team at the time of its founding. The Dream, the Sky, the Sun, the Wings, the Aces, the Sparks, and the Storm are all independently owned.

History[edit]

League founded and play begins (1996–97)[edit]

The creation of the WNBA was officially approved by the NBA Board of Governors on April 24, 1996,[2] and announced at a press conference with Rebecca Lobo, Lisa Leslie, and Sheryl Swoopes in attendance.[3] The new WNBA had to compete with the recently formed American Basketball League, another professional women's basketball league that began play in 1996.

The WNBA began with eight teams: the Charlotte Sting, Cleveland Rockers, Houston Comets and New York Liberty in the Eastern Conference; and the Los Angeles Sparks, Phoenix Mercury, Sacramento Monarchs and Utah Starzz in the Western Conference.[4]

While not the first major women's professional basketball league in the United States (a distinction held by the defunct WBL), the WNBA is the only league to receive full backing of the NBA.[5] The WNBA logo, "Logo Woman", paralleled the NBA logo and was selected out of 50 different designs.[4]

On the heels of a much-publicized gold medal run by the 1996 USA Basketball Women's National Team at the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, the WNBA began its first season on June 21, 1997 to little fanfare. The first WNBA game featured the New York Liberty facing the Los Angeles Sparks in Los Angeles. The game was televised nationally in the United States on the NBC television network. At the start of the 1997 season, the WNBA had television deals in place with NBC (NBA rights holder), and the Walt Disney Company and Hearst Corporation joint venture channels, ESPN and Lifetime Television Network, respectively. Penny Toler scored the league's first point.[6][7]

Houston domination and league expansion (1997–2000)[edit]

The WNBA centered its marketing campaign, dubbed "We Got Next", around stars Rebecca Lobo, Lisa Leslie and Sheryl Swoopes.[8] In the league's first season, Leslie's Los Angeles Sparks underperformed and Swoopes sat out much of the season due to her pregnancy. The WNBA's true star in 1997 was WNBA MVPCynthia Cooper, Swoopes' teammate on the Houston Comets. The Comets defeated Lobo's New York Liberty in the first WNBA Championship game. The initial "We Got Next" advertisement ran before each WNBA season until it was replaced with the "We Got Game" campaign.

Two teams were added in 1998 (Detroit and Washington)[9] and two more in 1999 (Orlando and Minnesota), bringing the number of teams in the league up to twelve.[10] The 1999 season began with a collective bargaining agreement between players and the league,[11] marking the first collective bargaining agreement to be signed in the history of women's professional sports.[citation needed] The WNBA also announced in 1999 that it would add four more team for the 2000 season (the Indiana Fever, the Seattle Storm, the Miami Sol, and the Portland Fire), bringing the league up to 16 teams, with WNBA President Val Ackerman discussing expansion: "This won't be the end of it. We expect to keep growing the league."[12]

In 1999, the league's chief competition, the American Basketball League, folded. Many of the ABL's star players, including several Olympic gold medalists (such as Nikki McCray and Dawn Staley) and a number of standout college performers (including Kate Starbird and Jennifer Rizzotti), then joined the rosters of WNBA teams and, in so doing, enhanced the overall quality of play in the league. When a lockout resulted in an abbreviated NBA season, the WNBA saw faltering TV viewership.

On May 23, 2000, the Houston Comets became the first WNBA team to be invited to the White House Rose Garden. Before this invitation, only men's sports teams had traveled to the White House.

At the end of the 2000 season, the Houston Comets won their fourth championship, capturing every title since the league's inception. Led by the "Big Three" of Sheryl Swoopes, Tina Thompson, and four-time Finals MVPCynthia Cooper, the Comets dominated every team in the league. Under head coach Van Chancellor, the team posted a 98–24 record through their first four seasons (16–3 in the Playoffs). After 2000, Cooper retired from the league and the Comets dynasty came to an end.

The L.A. Sparks; new league ownership and contraction (2001–2002)[edit]

The top contender in the 2001 season was the Los Angeles Sparks. Led by Lisa Leslie, the Sparks posted a regular-season record of 28–4. They advanced to their first ever WNBA Finals and swept the Charlotte Sting.

Looking to repeat in 2002, the Sparks again made a strong run toward the postseason, going 25–7 in the regular season under head coach Michael Cooper, formerly of the Los Angeles Lakers. Again, Leslie dominated opponents throughout the Playoffs, leading the Sparks to a perfect 6–0 record through all three rounds, beating the New York Liberty in the 2002 Finals.

Teams and the league were collectively owned by the NBA until the end of 2002, when the NBA sold WNBA teams either to their NBA counterparts in the same city or to a third party, as a result of the dot-com bubble. This led to two teams moving: Utah moved to San Antonio, and Orlando moved to Connecticut and became the first WNBA team to be owned by a third party instead of an NBA franchise. This sale of teams also led to two teams folding, the Miami Sol and Portland Fire, because new owners could not be found.

Bill Laimbeer leaves his mark (2003–2006)[edit]

The WNBA Players Association threatened to strike in 2003 if a new deal was not worked out between players and the league. The result was a delay in the start of the 2003 preseason. The 2003 WNBA Draft was also delayed and negative publicity was gained from this strike.[13]

After taking over a struggling franchise in 2002, former Detroit Pistons forward Bill Laimbeer had high hopes for the Detroit Shock in 2003. The team was just 9–23 in 2002. The Shock had three all-stars in the 2003 All-Star Game (Swin Cash, Cheryl Ford, and Deanna Nolan). Laimbeer orchestrated a worst-to-first turnaround and the Shock finished the season 25–9 in first place in the Eastern Conference. Winning the first two rounds of the Playoffs, the Shock faced two-time champion Los Angeles Sparks and Lisa Leslie in the 2003 Finals. The Shock beat the Sparks, winning game three on a three-pointer by Deanna Nolan.

After the 2003 season, the Cleveland Rockers, one of the league's original eight teams, folded because the owners were unwilling to continue operating the franchise.

Val Ackerman, the first WNBA president, resigned effective February 1, 2005, citing the desire to spend more time with her family. Ackerman later became president of USA Basketball. On February 15, 2005, NBA Commissioner David Stern announced that Donna Orender, who had been serving as the Senior Vice President of the PGA Tour and who had played for several teams in the now-defunct Women's Pro Basketball League, would be Ackerman's successor as of April 2005.

The WNBA awarded a expansion team to Chicago (later named the Sky) in February 2006. In the off-season, a set of rule changes was approved that made the WNBA more like the NBA.[14]

In 2006, the league became the first team-oriented women's professional sports league to exist for ten consecutive seasons.[citation needed] On the occasion of the tenth anniversary, the WNBA released its All-Decade Team, comprising the ten WNBA players to have contributed, through on-court play and off-court activities, the most to women's basketball during the league's existence.

After missing out on the Finals in 2004 and 2005, the Shock bounced back in 2006 behind newly acquired Katie Smith, along with six remaining members from their 2003 Finals run (Cash, Ford, Holland-Corn, Nolan, Powell, and Riley). The Shock finished second in the Eastern Conference, and knocked off first-seeded Connecticut in the second round of the Playoffs. The Shock faced reigning champion Sacramento Monarchs in a five-game series. The Shock won game five on their home floor.

Bringing "Paul Ball" to the WNBA (2007–2009)[edit]

In December 2006, the Charlotte Bobcats organization announced it would no longer operate the Charlotte Sting. Soon after, the WNBA announced that the Sting would not operate for 2007. A dispersal draft was held January 8, 2007. Teams selected in inverse order of their 2006 records; Chicago received the first pick.

Former Los Angeles Lakers championship coach Paul Westhead was named head coach of the Phoenix Mercury on October 11, 2005, bringing his up-tempo style of play to the WNBA. This fast-paced offense was perfect for his team, especially after the league shortened the shot clock from 30 seconds to 24 seconds in 2006. Much like the early Houston Comets championship teams, the Phoenix Mercury had risen to prominence led by their own "Big Three" of Cappie Pondexter, Diana Taurasi, and Penny Taylor.

The Mercury were well-suited for fast offense behind these three players. Phoenix averaged a league-record 88.97 points per game in 2007; teams could not keep up with the new style of play, and the Mercury were propelled into first place in the Western Conference. Facing the reigning champion Detroit Shock, the Mercury imposed their high-scoring offense with hopes of capturing their first title in franchise history. Averaging 93.2 points per game in the Finals series, the Mercury beat Detroit on their home floor in front of 22,076 fans in game five to claim their first ever WNBA title.

In October 2007 the WNBA awarded another expansion franchise to Atlanta. Atlanta businessman Ron Terwilliger was the original owner of the new team. Citizens of Atlanta were able to vote for their choices for the new team's nickname and colors.[15] The Dream, as they were named, played their first regular season game on May 17, which was a 67–100 loss to the Connecticut Sun.

Paul Westhead resigned from the Mercury after capturing the 2007 title and Penny Taylor opted to stay home to prepare for the 2008 Summer Olympics, causing the Mercury to falter in 2008. The team posted a 16–18 record and became the first team in WNBA history to miss the Playoffs after winning the championship in the previous season. In their place, the Detroit Shock won their third championship under coach Bill Laimbeer, solidifying their place in WNBA history before Laimbeer resigned early in 2009, effectively ending the Shock dynasty.

During the 2008 regular season, the first ever outdoor professional basketball game in North America was played at Arthur Ashe Stadium in New York City.[citation needed][16] The Indiana Fever defeated the New York Liberty 71–55 in front of over 19,000 fans.

Late in 2008, the WNBA took over ownership of one of the league's original franchises, the Houston Comets. The Comets ceased operations on December 1, 2008 after no owners for the franchise could be found.[17] A dispersal draft took place on December 8, 2008 and with the first pick, Sancho Lyttle was taken by the Atlanta Dream.

After an unsatisfying conclusion in 2008, the Mercury looked to bounce back to championship caliber. New head coach Corey Gaines implemented Paul Westhead's style of play, and the Mercury averaged 92.82 points per game throughout the 2009 season. Helped by the return of Penny Taylor, the Mercury once again locked up first place in the Western Conference and advanced to the 2009 Finals. The championship series was a battle of contrasting styles as the Mercury (number one league offense, 92.82 points per game) had to face the Indiana Fever (number three league defense, 73.55 points per game). The series went five games, including arguably one of the most thrilling games in WNBA history in game one of the series (Phoenix won in overtime, 120–116. The Mercury beat the Fever in game five, this time on their home court, to capture their second WNBA championship.

Not only did Paul Westhead's system influence his Mercury team, but it created a domino effect throughout the league. Young athletic players were capable of scoring more and playing at a faster pace. As a league, the 2010 average of 80.35 points per game was the best ever, far surpassing the 69.2 average in the league's inaugural season.

Changing of the guard (2010–2012)[edit]

On October 20, 2009, the WNBA announced that the Detroit Shock would relocate to Tulsa, Oklahoma; the team is called the Tulsa Shock.[18] On November 20, 2009, the WNBA announced that the Sacramento Monarchs had folded due to lack of support from its current owners, the Maloof family, who were also the owners of the Sacramento Kings at the time. The league announced it would seek new owners to relocate the team to the San Francisco Bay area; however, no ownership was found and a dispersal draft was held on December 14, 2009.

The 2010 season saw a tight race in the East, with three teams being tied for first place on the final day of the regular season. Five of the six teams in the East were in first place at some point during the season. The East held a .681 winning percentage over the West, its highest ever. In the 2010 Finals, two new teams represented each conference: the Seattle Storm and the Atlanta Dream. Seattle made their first finals appearance since winning it all in 2004 and Atlanta, coming into the playoffs as a four seed, impressively swept its opponents in the first two rounds to advance to the Finals in only the third year of the team's existence.

After the 2010 season, President Orender announced she would be resigning from her position as of December 31. On April 21, 2011, NBA commissioner David Stern announced that former Girl Scouts of the USA Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer Laurel J. Richie would assume duties as President on May 16, 2011.

The 2011 season began with strong publicity helped by the rising young stars of the league and the NBA lockout.[19] The 2011 NBA lockout began on July 1, 2011. Unlike the previous lockout, which affected the WNBA, president Laurel J. Richie confirmed that this lockout would have no effect on the WNBA. If the NBA season was shortened or canceled, the 2012 WNBA season (including the WNBA teams still owned by NBA owners) would run as planned. The lockout ended on November 26, and NBA teams would play a 66-game regular season following the lockout.

Many news outlets began covering the league more frequently. NBA TV, the television home of the NBA scheduled over 70 regular season games to be televised (along with a dozen more on ESPN2 and ABC). The new influx of young talent into the league gave many teams something to be excited about. Players like Candace Parker of the Sparks, Maya Moore of the Lynx, DeWanna Bonner of the Mercury, Angel McCoughtry of the Dream, Sylvia Fowles of the Sky, Tina Charles of the Sun, and Liz Cambage of the Shock brought a new level of excitement to the game, adding talent to the teams of young veterans such as Diana Taurasi, Seimone Augustus and Cappie Pondexter. The level of play was getting better, as evidenced by higher scoring, better defense, and higher shooting percentages. Fans responded to the new stars in the league; by the end of the 2011 regular season, nine of the twelve teams in the league had increased attendance over their 2010 averages.[20]

The new influx of talented young players showed that the league's longevity gave young girls something to work towards. Rookies coming into the league had the luxury of growing up watching veterans like Cynthia Cooper, Lisa Leslie and Teresa Weatherspoon. For the first time ever, young girls could now look at the WNBA as an opportunity for basketball to continue after college.

The new players delivered in 2011. Connecticut Sun center Tina Charles set a league record for double-doubles in a season with 23. Also, Sylvia Fowles of the Chicago Sky became only the second player in WNBA history to finish a season averaging at least 20 points (20.0ppg) and 10 rebounds (10.2rpg) per game. The San Antonio Silver Stars experienced boosts from their young players as well; rookie Danielle Adams scored 32 points off the bench in June and fellow rookie Danielle Robinson had a 36-point game in September. Atlanta Dream forward Angel McCoughtry was the first player in league history to average over 20 points per game (21.6ppg) while playing under 30 minutes per game (27.9mpg).

McCoughtry led her team to the Finals for the second straight year, but despite breaking her own Finals scoring record, the Dream was swept for the second straight year, this time by the Minnesota Lynx, which won its first title behind a fully healthy Seimone Augustus.

2012 featured a long Olympic break, but still saw the league grow. The Indiana Fever won the WNBA championship.

The Three to See (2013)[edit]

The much publicized 2013 WNBA Draft produced Baylor University star Brittney Griner, Delaware's Elena Delle Donne, and Notre Dame All American Skylar Diggins (now Diggins-Smith) as the top three picks, the draft was the first to be televised in primetime on ESPN. Griner, Delle Donne, and Diggins were thus labelled "The Three To See", but with the draft also came standouts such as Tayler Hill, Layshia Clarendon and Alex Bentley. The retirement of legends Katie Smith, Tina Thompson, Ticha Penicheiro, and Sheryl Swoopes coupled with the arrival of highly touted rookies and new rule changes effectively marked the end of an era for the WNBA and the ushering of another.[citation needed]

On the court, the Minnesota Lynx won their second title in three years, defeating the Atlanta Dream in the Finals, and becoming the first team to sweep the playoff since the Seattle Storm.

The promotion of Griner, Delle Donne, and Diggins helped boost television ratings for the league by 28 percent, and half of teams ended the season profitable.[21][22] The improved health of the league was on display after the season, when the Los Angeles Sparks' ownership group folded; it took the league only a few weeks to line up Guggenheim Partners to purchase the team, and the franchise also garnered interest from the ownership of the Golden State Warriors.

Teams[edit]

The WNBA originated with 8 teams in 1997, and through a sequence of expansions, contractions, and relocations currently consists of 12 teams. There have been a total of 18 franchises in WNBA history.

As of the league’s next season in 2018, the Las Vegas Aces (formerly the Utah Starzz and San Antonio Silver Stars/Stars), Los Angeles Sparks, New York Liberty, and Phoenix Mercury are the only remaining franchises that were founded in 1997.

ConferenceTeamCityArenaCapacityJoinedHead coach
Eastern
Atlanta DreamAtlanta, GeorgiaMcCamish Pavilion[note 1]8,6002008Nicki Collen
Chicago SkyChicago, IllinoisWintrust Arena10,3872006Amber Stocks
Connecticut SunUncasville, ConnecticutMohegan Sun Arena9,3231999*Curt Miller
Indiana FeverIndianapolis, IndianaBankers Life Fieldhouse18,1652000Pokey Chatman
New York LibertyWhite Plains, New YorkWestchester County Center5,0001997Katie Smith
Washington MysticsWashington, D.C.Capital One Arena20,3561998Mike Thibault
Western
Dallas WingsArlington, TexasCollege Park Center7,0001998*Fred Williams
Las Vegas AcesParadise, NevadaMandalay Bay Events Center12,0001997*Bill Laimbeer
Los Angeles SparksLos Angeles, CaliforniaStaples Center18,9971997Brian Agler
Minnesota LynxMinneapolis, MinnesotaTarget Center19,3561999Cheryl Reeve
Phoenix MercuryPhoenix, ArizonaTalking Stick Resort Arena18,0551997Sandy Brondello
Seattle StormSeattle, WashingtonKeyArena15,3542000Dan Hughes

An asterisk (*) denotes a franchise move. See the respective team articles for more information.

Note

Relationship with NBA teams[edit]

Seven WNBA teams are associated with the NBA team from the same market and are known as sister teams. These teams include the Indiana Pacers and Fever, the Los Angeles Lakers and Sparks, the Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx, the New York Knicks and Liberty, the Phoenix Suns and Mercury, the Atlanta Hawks and the Dream, and the Washington Wizards and Mystics. Of these teams, only the Dream and the Sparks are owned separately; the Liberty may join this group as The Madison Square Garden Company, owner of the Knicks and Liberty, has put the Liberty up for sale since late 2017.[24][25] Through the 2017 season, the San Antonio Spurs and Stars were also paired, but that relationship ended in October 2017 when the Stars were bought by MGM Resorts International and moved to Las Vegas.[26]

Three WNBA teams are in the same market as an NBA team but are not affiliated. Though located in the same market, the Chicago Sky are not affiliated with the Bulls, as evidenced by their differing home arenas: the Sky will move from Allstate Arena in nearby Rosemont to Wintrust Arena in Chicago's Near South Side for 2018 and beyond, while the Bulls play at United Center in the city's Near West Side. The Dallas Wings, which had been the Tulsa Shock before moving to the Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex after the 2015 season, are not affiliated with the existing NBA team in the Metroplex, the Dallas Mavericks. As with the Sky and Bulls, the Wings and Mavericks play in different arenas, with the Wings playing at College Park Center in Arlington as opposed to the Mavericks playing just outside downtown Dallas at American Airlines Center.

The remaining WNBA team, the Seattle Storm, was formerly the sister team of the now relocatedSuperSonics but was sold to a Seattle-based group before the SuperSonics moved and become the Oklahoma City Thunder.

The now defunct Charlotte Sting, Miami Sol, Portland Fire, Cleveland Rockers, Orlando Miracle, Houston Comets and Sacramento Monarchs were also sister teams of the Hornets, Heat, Trail Blazers, Cavaliers, Magic, Rockets and Kings, respectively. The Utah Starzz were affiliated with the Jazz before relocating to San Antonio as the Silver Stars under the ownership of the parent company of the Spurs in 2003. Becoming the Stars in 2014, they shared the Spurs' team colors. The team would eventually relocate to Las Vegas as the Aces in 2017. The Detroit Shock was the sister team of the Pistons until the teams' owner sold the Shock to investors who moved the team to Tulsa, Oklahoma. During its tenure in Tulsa, it was not affiliated with Oklahoma's NBA team, the Oklahoma City Thunder.

The Liberty, Sparks, and Wings are currently the only teams that share a market with an NBA G League team; the Liberty share the New York City market with the Long Island Nets and Westchester Knicks, also sharing an arena with the latter team; the Sparks share the Los Angeles market with the Agua Caliente Clippers and South Bay Lakers; and the Wings share the Dallas market with the Texas Legends. In addition, three teams are located within 150 miles of WNBA teams (the Delaware 87ers, Fort Wayne Mad Ants, and Northern Arizona Suns being near the Mystic, Fever, and Mercury, respectively). The Stars were also within 150 miles of a G League team (the Austin Spurs) before their move to Las Vegas.

Two more WNBA teams will share markets with G League teams in the near future. The Mystics will be joined by the Capital City Go-Go in 2018–19, and will share an arena with that team. The Dream will be joined by the Erie BayHawks upon the BayHawks' relocation to the Atlanta area in 2019–20. The Shock shared the Tulsa market with the Tulsa 66ers until the latter team was relocated to become the Oklahoma City Blue in 2014.

Membership timeline[edit]

Season(s)# Teams
19978
199810
199912
2000–200216
200314
2004–200513
200614
200713
200814
200913
2010–present12

Relocated teams[edit]

Folded teams[edit]

Season format[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Teams hold training camps in May. Training camps allow the coaching staff to prepare the players for the regular season, and determine the 12-woman roster with which they will begin the regular season. After training camp, a series of preseason exhibition games are held.

The WNBA regular season begins in May. During the regular season, each team plays 34 games, 17 each home and away. Each team plays one in-conference team 4 times and the remaining in-conference teams 3 times each (12 games). Each team then plays the six out-of-conference teams 3 times (18 games). As in the NBA, each team hosts and visits every other team at least once every season.

WNBA All-Star Game[edit]

In 1999 the league held its first ever All Star Game where the best players of the Eastern Conference played against the best players of the Western Conference. Since the All Star games were ongoing, the west has been dominant until 2006 the east finally won a game.

In July, the regular season pauses to celebrate the annual WNBA All-Star Game. The game is part of a weekend-long event, held in a selected WNBA city each year. The actual game is played on the selected WNBA team's home court. The All-Star Game features star players from the Western Conference facing star players from the Eastern Conference. During the season, fans vote for the players they would like to see start the game. In 2004, The Game at Radio City was in held in place of a traditional All-Star Game. The 2006 All-Star Game was the first game to feature custom uniforms that match the decade anniversary logo. No WNBA All-Star Game is held in every Olympic year since 2008. In 2010, an exhibition game (Stars at the Sun) was held.

Shortly after the All-Star break is the trading deadline. After this date, teams are not allowed to exchange players with each other for the remainder of the season, although they may still sign and release players. Major trades are often completed right before the trading deadline.

During years in which the Summer Olympics are held, the WNBA takes a month off in the middle of the season to allow players to practice and compete with their respective national teams.

WNBA Playoffs[edit]

Main article: WNBA Playoffs

The WNBA Playoffs begin in late September, with eight teams qualifying for the playoffs. Having a higher seed offers several advantages. Since the first two seeds get double byes, and the next two seeds get first-round byes, having a higher seed generally means one will be facing a weaker team. The team in each series with the better record has home court advantage. Since 2016 Verizon is the official sponsor.

The first two playoff rounds follow a tournament format with each team playing a rival in a single elimination game, whichever team that wins, advances into the next round, while losers are eliminated from the playoffs. For the first round, the matchups by seed are 5th vs 8th and 6th vs 7th. In the second round, the matchups by seed are 3rd vs the lowest remaining seed and 4th vs the highest remaining seed. In the semifinals, the matchups by seed are 1st vs the lowest remaining seed and 2nd vs the highest remaining seed. This leaves two teams left to play each other in the WNBA Finals. In the first and second rounds, is a single elimination game. In the semifinals, the best-of-five series follows a 2–2–1 home-court pattern, meaning that the higher-seeded team will have home court in games 1, 2, and 5 while the other team plays at home in game 3 and 4. This pattern has been in place since 2016 (changed from the best-of-three series 1–1–1 format for four teams in each conferences, where the higher seed hosted the opening game in the first two rounds).

WNBA Finals[edit]

Main article: WNBA Finals

The final playoff round, a best-of-five series between the victors of each conference, is known as the WNBA Finals, and is held annually, currently scheduled for October. Each player on the winning team receives a championship ring. In addition, the league awards a WNBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award. For this round, the series follows a 2–2–1 pattern, meaning that one team will have home court in games 1, 2, and 5, while the other plays at home in games 3 and 4. The 2–2–1 pattern in the WNBA Finals has been in place since 2005.

The WNBA Finals

Lisa Leslie of the Sparks
Diana Taurasi of the Mercury
  1. ^Due to renovations to Philips Arena, the Dream will play their 2018 home games at McCamish Pavilion on the campus of Georgia Tech, where they also played in 2017.[23]
Current WNBA logo with NBA color scheme
Maya Moore of the Minnesota Lynx, MVP of the 2014 WNBA Season.

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